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Kohlrabi 101

What is Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi, also known as German turnip or cabbage turnip, is very popular in Northern and Eastern European countries like Germany and Hungary as well as northern Vietnam and eastern India. The funny-looking vegetable is part of the same family as broccoli and cabbage and can be eaten raw or cooked in a variety of dishes.

Kohlrabi grows as a bulb with leaves shooting up from the sides, giving it an almost alien look. It can be white, green, or purple with little difference in flavour, and has a mild taste that has made it popular in dishes from salads to soups. Peeling and chopping or slicing is the only prep required. Farmers like to plant the bulb since it is easy to grow in tandem with other crops and has a long growing season, making it a popular farmers’ market find. Kohlrabi tends to be moderately priced when compared to other farmers’ market veggies.  Ref The Spruce Eats

Storage & Cooking Tips

Storage

Fresh kohlrabi can stay fresh in the refrigerator for about 1 week. It’s better to separate the leaves when storing, removing them from the root and keeping them in a plastic bag before preparing them. 

Preparation

Wash the kohlrabi thoroughly, cut off the leaves and peel the root. Cut the lower end with a sharp knife, removing any woody, fibrous parts. 

What To Make With Kohlrabi

The light green kohlrabi leaves taste great and are full of nutrients – far too good to throw away! Therefore, only remove large leaves that are no longer quite crisp and fresh and prepare the rest this way: wash them thoroughly, shake dry, then chop them very finely and sprinkle over the kohlrabi or other vegetables, or vegetable soup or mixed salad. You can also use the cooking water for soups or sauces, for example. It contains about 50 percent of the valuable mustard oils that dissolve from the kohlrabi during cooking.

Unlike most other types of cabbage, kohlrabi is easy to digest and has a particularly high nutrient content. In order to ensure the healthful integrity of the vegetable, make sure to keep cook times short when preparing kohlrabi. Steam it in a little salted water or broth for a maximum of 10-15 minutes, taking it out when it is still relatively firm. Whole roots need a while longer to cook, about 20-30 minutes. Those who like the fine cabbage taste of kohlrabi are spoilt for choice. The crunchy texture makes it delicious raw when tossed into salads. It’s also delicious in casseroles, gratins or vegetarian buffers.

  • Roast it – As I mentioned above, if you’ve never worked with this interesting vegetable, I think this Roasted Kohlrabi recipe is the place to start. The result of this super easy recipe is a very, naturally sweet treat.
  • Purée it – It’s delicious in soups and sauces.
  • Sauté it – this will have a similar result to roasting, as it will caramelize nicely bringing all of the natural sugars to the surface.
  • Eat it raw – It’s wonderful in slaws, salads, or as a vehicle for delicious dips!
  • Spiralize it – A pretty way to serve it raw or cooked.

Kohlrabi  greens can also be used in a stir-fry, and  you can  use the stems in stocks and broths.

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Golden Beetroot 101

Golden Beetroot Facts & Health Benefits

When you think of beetroots, you probably think of red beets. But like carrots, peppers and other vegetables, beets also grow in a rainbow of colours, which includes golden beets. Like their more common red cousins,  golden beets are a nutritional powerhouse. They’re loaded with vitamins, minerals and antioxidants.

Varieties

Red beets may be the most familiar variety, but beets come in a rainbow of colours. Yellow, white, and even candy-striped (with red and white concentric circles) beets are available in specialty markets. Sugar beets are used to make table sugar.

Health Benefits

The leaves and roots of beetroots are packed with nutrition including antioxidants that fight cell damage and reduce the risk of heart disease.  They’re one of the few vegetables that contain betalains, a powerful antioxidant that gives beets their vibrant colour.  Betalains reduce inflammation and may help protect against cancer and other diseases.

Nutritional data (1 cup cooked)

  • Calories: 58
  • Protein: 2 g
  • Carb: 13 g
  • Fiber 3 g
  • Fat: 0
  • Potassium: 442 mg

Nutritionally, the golden beet is quite similar to that of red beets. They have similar carbohydrate, fat and protein content and both are equally packed with potassium, a blood pressure-lowering mineral. But there are also some differences beyond basic nutrition. For starters, golden beets are sweeter in taste, and less earthy in flavor. For those who do not like the taste of red beets, there’s a good chance that they may enjoy golden beets. The main nutritional difference between the two are the pigments.

Different Pigments, Same Power

The pigments that give beets their rich colors is a type of antioxidant called betalains. There are two basic types of betalains: betacyanins and betaxanthins. The red beet contains betacyanins pigments; the golden beets contain betaxanthins. In general terms, dark-colored beets contain mostly betacyanins and yellow beets contain mostly betaxanthins. Despite a difference in structure, both betalains function both as antioxidants and anti-inflammatory agents.

Golden Beetroot Also Offers Nitrates

One of the main benefits of red beets is its high level of nitrates. It has been documented that nitrates in beets can act to enhance sports performance as well as lower blood pressure. The good news is that despite the color difference, golden beets also contain a similar level of nitrates. Whichever beet you choose, you will not lose out on health benefits of nitrates.

What’s unique in golden beets is the other nutrients commonly found in other yellow and orange vegetables. Vitamin C, Vitamin A, beta-carotene, flavonoid and zeaxanthin are also present in golden beets.

Flavour Profile

Preparation

Golden beets can vary in sweetness; they tend to be a bit sweeter and taste a little less earthy and more mellow in intensity than red beetroot. Thanks to its beautiful yellow colour, roasted Golden beets can brighten up any food dish and look marvellous in all kinds of salads.

Golden beets are much easier to peel and creates less of a mess than the red varieties. Alternately, I always cook it with the skin on, and then peel after it’s cooked; it’s much easier than peeling when raw.

Both betalain pigments in beets are water-soluble so I do not recommend boiling them. Either steam or bake beets whole to preserve as much nutrient as possible.

  • To bake, set your oven to (195c, wash beets and then wrap them in aluminum foil. Depending on size, bake them whole for 45 to 60 mins.
  • To steam, set temperature (stove or steamer) to high. Wash and steam with skin on for 15 minutes. Poke beets with a fork to check doneness.

In addition, you can juice golden beets in a blender just like you can with red beets.

Storage

Cleaning

To store beets, trim the leaves 2 inches from the root as soon as you get home. The leaves will sap the moisture from the beetroot. Do not trim the taproot. Store the leaves in a separate plastic bag and use within two days. The root bulbs should also be bagged and stored in the refrigerator’s crisper for seven to 10 days. Cooked beets may be refrigerated up to one week.
Fresh cooked beets may also be frozen up to 10 months, either whole or cut. Be sure to peel before freezing in airtight containers or baggies, leaving no air in the container. Pickling beets is another popular method of preservation.

Gold Beetroot juice will slightly stain skin and porous surfaces. Rub your hands with wet salt and lemon juice and then wash with soap and water. To clean chopping boards, containers or other stained plastics, use
coarse salt and lemon juice. Sprinkle the salt liberally over the board, then slice a lemon in half and use it to rub the salt into the board

Beetroot on the menu

Beets add a colourful flair to dishes, even beyond salad and soup. There are plenty of recipes in which you can explore this vegetable’s full potential.

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Fennel 101

Fennel Facts & Recipes

Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) is a perennial herb that belongs to the carrot family. Though its thick stalks with feathery leaves and bright poofs of yellow flowers are native to the Mediterranean region, they grow wild on the side of roads everywhere in Australia, where it’s earned full-on invasive weed status.  Fennel can be enjoy year round though is a perfect for winter due to its ability to aid digestion and warm the body.

Health Benefits

Fennel is super high in dietary fibre, covering more than 25 percent of your daily value, as well as potassium, which is crucial in maintaining low blood pressure. It’s got vitamins A, C, B6, and a host of others, reining in those free radicals that lead to premature ageing.  

Fennel can help fight infections, aid with sleep, breast milk production, increase antioxidants in the body, aid with constipation and as previously stated, aids with digestion as catalogued in many studies. 

 

Flavour Profile

Flavour: Fennel is renowned for having sweet liquorice flavours and is very aromatic. Its fragrance ranges across all its parts hence it is such a popular ingredient. If you dry toast your fennel seeds you’ll get an incredible smell wafting through your kitchen while the aromatic fragrance from slicing raw fennel is unlike any other vegetable.

Texture: Fennel fronds are delicate to touch and make for excellent garnishes. They are bright green and can be described as feather-like in appearance.

Preparation

Whether you use the leaves, stalks or bulb, fennel is easy to prepare, regardless of your dish of choice, as it can be cut according to preference and recipe requirements. The best way to slice fennel, however, is vertically through the bulb.

Frond: It’s delicate leaves resemble that of dill which is not surprising considering they are related and is the herb part of its versatility.  Lightly rinse in fresh cold water and lay on cloth or tea towel to dry

Bulb: This part of the fennel grows above ground though you still need to wash the dirt away.  There may be dirt in the first few layers. 

Fennel is becoming a popular addition to salads, smoothies and winter-warming soups. 

Storage

How to Store Fennel. To store fennel, trim the fronds to two or three inches above the bulb (if not already done). Wrap loosely in a plastic bag and store in the fridge for 5 days or 10 days if you’re getting fennel direct from the garden or farmer.

Fennel on the menu

Fennel Omlette "Ejjit"

This Lebanese dis is consumed regularly in many house holds. The fennel adds a sweet taste and aroma to the egg

32 'delicious' recipes

Brought you by delicious magazine.

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Papaya 101

Papaya Facts and Heath Benefits

The papaya is botanically a berry. It may look like it grows from a tree, but the papaya is actually the fruit of an herb. And a tall one at that — the papaya tree can grow over 10 feet tall. The word papaya derives from the Carib word ababai.

 

Australian grown papa a is available all year round with peaks in spring and autumn.

In recent year the Beetroot has made a grand comeback and been crowned a ‘superfood’ due to its high levels of antioxidants, which give them their rich purple colour. Beetroots are also an excellent source of iron, fibre, vitamin A, C and a range of B vitamins.

Historically the humble beetroot was generally used for dyes and natural medicinal purposes to aid in lowering triglyceride levels in the blood and enhance sexual performance.

Today, beetroots are inexpensive and most often used for dips and salads. The root can also be made into beet juice, which is popular for detoxification juicing. Beets need to be washed and the greens removed prior to cooking; they don’t have to be peeled.

Varieties

Red Papaya

• Bright orange/red flesh • Often pear shaped • Often green/yellow coloured skin • Sweet Flavour

Yellow Pawpaw

• Distinct yellow flesh • Often rounder and larger than Red Papaya • Often pale orange skin • Less sweet flavour

Health Benefits

Papaya is rich with vitamins, minerals and reduces inflammation. In fact, a cup of raw papaya contains 150 percent of the recommended daily intake of Vitamin C as well as 31 percent of Vitamin A and 10 percent of potassium. Papaya is high in beta carotene, which has been known to cause carotenemia, a harmless and temporary yellowing of the skin if you eat a ton of it.

NOTE:  papaya contains latex and may cause a reaction in those who are allergic.

Boost your immunity:

Keep your body strong with a delicious dose of papaya.  A single serve provides double your daily vitamin C requirements, helping keep your immune system in tip top shape.

Get your glow on:
Papaya contains a unique bundle of antioxidants which are essential for healthy glowing skin. The tasty tropical fruit is also 90% water, to keep your skin hydrated and refreshed!

Mums and Bubs:

Papaya is high in both folate and vitamin A, which are essential for the healthy development of babies in early pregnancy. The soft texture is also ideal for babies first food.

Gut Health:

Papaya contains both soluble and insoluble fibres – which are both essential for a healthy and happy gut.

Feel fuller for longer:

Papaya is the perfect go-to snack. Not only is it low in kilojoules, it’s also high in fibre and has a moderate GI, which helps keep you feeling fuller for longer

Storing Papayas

Papayas are highly perishable. Once they ripen, they won’t last long unless refrigerated, and even then, no longer than a week or two.

Cooking with Papaya

Most people eat papaya raw. All you have to do is slice up the fruit into cubes, discarding the skin and seeds. You can even dress it with lime juice and a sprinkling of cayenne pepper. Fancy! In Thailand, they shred green papaya raw and serve in a salad called Som Tam with fish sauce, lime, sprouts, vegetables and fresh herbs. If you’re feeling adventurous, you can dry and grind papaya seeds and use as a black pepper substitute. Other uses for papaya include folk remedies to treat wounds, bites and Dengue fever.

Preserving Papayas

The easiest way to save your papaya for later is to freeze in cubes, which can then be added to smoothies. But there is a long tradition in warmer climes of making into jam, chutney or pickles. Try dried papaya for a healthy snack when traveling.

Papaya on the menu

Beets add a colourful flair to dishes, even beyond salad and soup. There are plenty of recipes in which you can explore this vegetable’s full potential.

Dried Papaya

9 incredible benefits of dried papaya

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Red Beetroot 101

Red Beetroot Facts & Health Benefits

The beetroot (Beta vulgaris) is a common root vegetable that that grows as a round bulb with a leafy top poking out above the soil. The beetroots stand out from other root vegetables due to their dark red colour.

In recent year the Beetroot has made a grand comeback and been crowned a ‘superfood’ due to its high levels of antioxidants, which give them their rich purple colour. Beetroots are also an excellent source of iron, fibre, vitamin A, C and a range of B vitamins.

Historically the humble beetroot was generally used for dyes and natural medicinal purposes to aid in lowering triglyceride levels in the blood and enhance sexual performance.

Today, beetroots are inexpensive and most often used for dips and salads. The root can also be made into beet juice, which is popular for detoxification juicing. Beets need to be washed and the greens removed prior to cooking; they don’t have to be peeled.

Varieties

Red beets may be the most familiar variety, but beets come in a rainbow of colours. Yellow, white, and even candy-striped (with red and white concentric circles) beets are available in specialty markets. Sugar beets are used to make table sugar.

Health Benefits

The leaves and roots of beetroots are packed with nutrition including antioxidants that fight cell damage and reduce the risk of heart disease.  They’re one of the few vegetables that contain betalains, a powerful antioxidant that gives beets their vibrant colour.  Betalains reduce inflammation and may help protect against cancer and other diseases.

Beetroot bulbs have many helpful plant compounds that reduce inflammation and protect cells from damage. Some of the other health benefits of beetroot include:

Increase Stamina

The beetroot and its juice help your heart and lungs work better during exercise.  Nitric oxide from beetroots increases blood flow to your muscles.

Prevent Heart Disease and Stroke

Beetroots are rich in folate (vitamin B9) which helps cells grow and function. Folate plays a key role in controlling damage to blood vessels, which can reduce the risk of heart disease ad stroke.

Lowers Blood Pressure 

Beetroots are naturally high in nitrate, which are turned into nitric oxide in the body. This compound lowers blood pressure by causing the blood vessels to relax and widen. 

Boost Your Immune System

Beetroots are high in fibre and promote the growth of good bacteria in your gut. Having plenty of healthy bacteria in your digestive system helps fight disease and boost your immune system.  Fibre also improves digestion and reduces the risk of constipation.

Nutrition

In addition to the above-average nutrient content, beetroot mainly consists of water. About 87% of the root consists of water and is supplemented by 8% carbohydrates and 3% fibre. 100 grams contain only about 42 calories and at the same time only 0.1 grams of fat.

Flavour Profile

Preparation

Beets are best described as having an earthy flavour with a surprising amount of sweetness for a root vegetable. Some people describe the earthiness as tasting like dirt and dislike beets for that reason. However, when cleaned properly and cooked, that earthy taste typically goes away.

Although beets can be eaten raw, they are generally boiled, baked, steamed, fried, grilled before eating. Beetroots must be thoroughly washed first to remove all of the dirt that comes with root vegetables.
 
Cut off the taproot and leaves, saving the greens to prepare for salads and or swiss chard. To retain the vegetable’s nutrients and colour, cook the beets without peeling first. The skin easily rubs off under cold running water after cooking.

Storage

Cleaning

To store beets, trim the leaves 2 inches from the root as soon as you get home. The leaves will sap the moisture from the beetroot. Do not trim the taproot. Store the leaves in a separate plastic bag and use within two days. The root bulbs should also be bagged and stored in the refrigerator’s crisper for seven to 10 days. Cooked beets may be refrigerated up to one week.
Fresh cooked beets may also be frozen up to 10 months, either whole or cut. Be sure to peel before freezing in airtight containers or baggies, leaving no air in the container. Pickling beets is another popular method of preservation.

Beetroot juice will stain skin and porous surfaces; it’s used as a natural dye for foods and fabric. Rub your hands with wet salt and lemon juice and then wash with soap and water. To clean chopping boards, containers or other stained plastics, use
coarse salt and lemon juice. Sprinkle the salt liberally over the board, then slice a lemon in half and use it to rub the salt into the board

Beetroot on the menu

Beets add a colourful flair to dishes, even beyond salad and soup. There are plenty of recipes in which you can explore this vegetable’s full potential.

Beetroot Powder Recipe

Find out how to make beetroot powder for your homemade cosmetics, food colourings, or as a healthy supplement to your diet.

Beetroot Resih

Beetroot relish is a delicious way to use up leftover beetroots. It can be used in the same ways as a chutney or jam, and makes a beautiful addition to sandwiches, burgers, salads, cheese boards, and more!

Roast Beetroot

Roasting brings out the full sweetness of this lovely vegetable. The process is simple and straightforward, yielding beets with an intensified sweet flavour and no compromise on texture.

Beetroot Soup

https://wellnourished.com.au is a favourite! Creator Georgia Harding Australian Naturopath touches on all areas of health including children and fussy eats. Lover her site!

Pickled beetroot

Make your own sweet pickled beetroot to use in any dish of your choice

Beetroot Dessert

Raw Chocolate Diet Cheesecake